Press releases and media coverage

Following extensive testing and field trials, Mainmark Ground Engineering has marketed what it says is the first commercially viable, non-invasive ground improvement and liquefaction mitigation technique that can be applied beneath existing structures.

Mainmark Ground Engineering is introducing Terefirm, a non-invasive soil densification and liquefaction mitigation technique for existing structures.

Following testing and field trials, Mainmark has rolled out the first commerciallyviable, non-invasive ground improvement and liquefaction mitigation technique that can be applied beneath existing structures.

Mainmark has been providing specialist ground engineering and asset preservation solutions since 1983.

Originally founded in Australia, our local operation has grown into a global enterprise with offices in New Zealand, the UK, Japan and Thailand.

A resin injection process developed by Mainmark following the Christchurch earthquake offers a groundbreaking solution to the problem of liquefaction.

This article first appeared in Engineering New Zealand’s magazine, EG, in issue 7/2019.

With increasingly strict regulations in place for mine site remediation and soil quality, organisations are examining a variety of methodologies to identify and remediate weakened foundations, soil subsidence, underground voids, ageing assets, and control erosion.

Foundations are one of the most structurally significant parts of any home. While solid, stable foundations can help to support a home for years to come, buildings can and will move.

Foundations are one of the most structurally significant parts of any home. While solid, stable foundations can help to support a home for years to come, buildings can and will move.

Ground engineering and asset preservation specialist Mainmark filled voids and lifted the slab and re-levelled the railway line in the Kaimai Tunnel.

While the 2010 and 2011 Canterbury earthquakes were not New Zealand’s largest seismic events in recent years, they resulted in the most damage and loss of life. The Canterbury sequence also put a renewed community focus on earthquake engineering and the strengthening of structures.

Mainmark: How can you make an earthquake-prone structure more resilient? This was the question posed recently by operators of a wastewater treatment plant in Wellington, New Zealand, as they sought proactive measures to protect the asset following the introduction of The Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act 2016 (EPBA) on 1 July 2017.

Mainmark: Geotechnical engineers often specify the use of deep drilling to assess soil conditions before commencing complex construction projects. Choosing the right drilling method is one of the most important decisions and can directly impact project outcomes.

Unstable ground can lead to structural issues with a building, affecting worker safety and business operations.
Some of the signs of unstable ground include sloping and sinking floors, and cracks in transport yard pavements and driveways.