Press releases and media coverage

Ground engineering and asset preservation specialist Mainmark filled voids and lifted the slab and re-levelled the railway line in the Kaimai Tunnel.

While the 2010 and 2011 Canterbury earthquakes were not New Zealand’s largest seismic events in recent years, they resulted in the most damage and loss of life. The Canterbury sequence also put a renewed community focus on earthquake engineering and the strengthening of structures.

Mainmark: How can you make an earthquake-prone structure more resilient? This was the question posed recently by operators of a wastewater treatment plant in Wellington, New Zealand, as they sought proactive measures to protect the asset following the introduction of The Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act 2016 (EPBA) on 1 July 2017.

Mainmark: Geotechnical engineers often specify the use of deep drilling to assess soil conditions before commencing complex construction projects. Choosing the right drilling method is one of the most important decisions and can directly impact project outcomes.

Unstable ground can lead to structural issues with a building, affecting worker safety and business operations.
Some of the signs of unstable ground include sloping and sinking floors, and cracks in transport yard pavements and driveways.

New Zealand is no stranger to seismic activity and Christchurch residents know only too well the importance of structural integrity. Widespread liquefaction has affected countless building foundations in the region, including the Kamahi Apartments, an eight-storey residential apartment building in Merivale.

Mainmark: The community relies heavily on a network of roads, bridges, tunnels, railways, ports, airports and public transport. However, as Australia and New Zealand’s populations soar, these assets will come under increasing pressure, requiring an innovative and efficient approach to maintenance and remediation.

Mainmark: Local councils and government departments are responsible for a significant range of assets, from roads, bridges and footpaths, to water, sewerage, and drainage. Ensuring they remain in good working condition to service the public safely, efficiently and without failure is essential. Ongoing monitoring and maintenance of infrastructure is crucial, not only to ensure operational efficiency and safety, but to also preserve the asset’s longevity well into the future.

Although buildings might appear to be static structures, they are constantly moving, affected by even the minutest vibration of someone walking past. What if we could record these vibrations to develop a detailed structural analysis of a building?

Retaining walls are an increasing feature of construction sites as sky high land prices add pressure to maximise the potential returns from each build.

Mainmark’s UK team has done a great job remediating this London home suffering significant cracking due to subsidence. Thanks to renowned property expert and TV presenter Sarah Beeny for filming and sharing this project.

Although buildings might appear to be static structures, they are constantly moving, affected by even the minutest vibration of someone walking past. What if we could record these vibrations to develop a detailed structural analysis of a building?